Simple, Spiritual, Outdated Living in a Vintage New England Home on the Southern Coast of Maine

Monday, February 27, 2012

Prominent Doctor Sees the Wisdom of the 1950s Way

I just read a fantastic article written by a physician who sees the need for real change in the way we live and eat as opposed to waiting for the "cure" via pharmaceuticals. He wrote:

A half century ago, there was dramatically less obesity. Very little about genes, metabolism or human nature has changed in the past five decades. We have epidemic childhood obesity now; we did not have it then. The ambient level of "personal responsibility" in 8 year olds has not changed over that span.

YES!  

And: A dramatic change in the epidemiology of obesity is directly related to profound changes in our environments, food supply, activity levels and social norms. We have caused the obesity epidemic, by looking the other way as a staggering array of "advances" made ever more calories ever more temptingly available, and made physical activity ever more elusive.

I highly recommend you read his article over at Huffington Post. In my book I am writing about many similar principles.

Wednesday, February 22, 2012

1950s Advice from "Diet and Like it": Just say "No, thank you."



I have a charming little diet booklet from 1957 called "Diet and Like it." In it I found this advice: 

As a guest in a private home, you are somewhat at the mercy of your hostess. But no code of manners calls for accepting a second slice of cake and you can refuse without appearing ungracious. In fact, in this age of dieting, the ungracious one is the insistent hostess.

Have you ever had an awkward moment as a guest when you felt obliged to indulge beyond what you wanted to eat? Or maybe you are like me and have memories of wanting to eat (or actually eating) way more than beyond "polite!"

Saturday, February 11, 2012

Sugar at Supper Time! Lawrence Welk on PBS

I have a secret that will be no more. Well, some close friends know.


I sometimes watch The Lawrence Welk Show on Saturday evenings.

What's nice is that whenever I bring it up in a conversation I pretty much get the same response: "Is that still on? I used to love watching it at my grandparents' house!" And their faces light up before they realize how uncool that might sound.

Good news! Although the show began airing in 1955 and ran until 1982, you can watch Lawrence Welk reruns on PBS!

Yes, it's often syrupy but sometimes I need that to offset the dark and seedy "entertainment" of 2012. If you don't like the music then the sets, outfits and hair are a feast for admirers of vintage style. Look at the fantastic "Mad Men" hair in the above video!

But no, that isn't enough for me. I'm going to live wild tonight because I recently purchased vintage TV trays so that I could eat dinner at the same time. 

I hope you're laughing at me because I am. This is all coming from a gal who enjoyed mosh pits in the 1980s! Rock-n-Roll by day, easy listening at night. That's me.

OK so this may all sound silly but so many of us engage in stress eating. We're bombarded with negative and depressing images online and on TV. Unlike the 1950s we get news updates every second which can be toxic to our mental well-being. Sometimes modern life calls for an antidote of schmaltz. 

Why not try a little no-cal sugar in your evening tonight?

Wednesday, February 8, 2012

American PETS Didn't Get Fat in the 50s

I just discovered the Association for Pet Obesity Prevention. In their news section:

The fifth annual veterinary survey found 53 percent of adult dogs and 55 percent of cats to be classified as overweight or obese by their veterinarian. That equals 88.4 million pets that are too heavy according to veterinarians. 

“The most distressing finding in this year’s study was the fact that more pet owners are unaware their pet is overweight.” comments APOP founder Dr. Ernie Ward. 

“22 percent of dog owners and 15 percent of cat owners characterized their pet as normal weight when it was actually overweight or obese. This is what I refer to as the “fat pet gap” or the normalization of obesity by pet parents. In simplest terms, we’ve made fat pets the new normal.” 

The changing bodyscape of Americans is distorting our idea of what is healthy. Obesity has become normalized and it's hard for many to see it not just in themselves but in their pets now, too!