Simple, Spiritual, Outdated Living in a Vintage New England Home on the Southern Coast of Maine

Thursday, July 4, 2013

How to say "no" this Independence Day and EVERY day

I LOVE this suggestion from Jack LaLanne on how to say "no" when offered something that's not good for you, or when you've had enough to eat and are offered more. It comes from his his book that I'm now reading, Foods for Glamour, 1961:

Once I would fib when refusing the extra cream sauce and gobs of butter. I said I was having gall bladder trouble (which I've never had in my life) and my doctor wouldn't let me eat them. Now, however, I enjoy making up answers for these open-handed calory (sic) dispensers. "I have a terrible allergy. I'm allergic to looking in the mirror and seeing myself fat." Funny, but it always works like a charm.

You can also simply say: "No, thank you."

Wednesday, July 3, 2013

1950s: Exercise for health and beauty vs Today: Work-outs to work-off or earn junk

My diet books and articles from the 1950s and early 60s offer advice on how to exercise for better health and figure, guidelines and menus for how to eat less as well as the right foods for reducing. 

What they don't suggest is that you stick to a strict diet so that you can later binge and then do a work out to work it off. Exercise is a reward to oneself and for some, a way to undo self-abuse. For example, an overweight and out of shape woman is instructed to take on a new program of exercise, but it's not a tool in a bag of chips to be used as a way to justify eating poorly and too much moving forward.

From Weight Watchers:

There's really no limit to the ways you can earn activity PointsPlus values. "Do an activity three or four times a week, and you can swap PointsPlus values for a special dinner out or an extra slice of pizza and a beer," says meetings leader Mary Martin of Flemington, New Jersey. 

When I was on the "Points" system about ten years ago I began to see exercise as a way to earn junk food. It was a means to eat MORE instead of a way to appreciate it for its own rewards. My 1950s research changed that for me, thankfully.

What place does exercise have you in your day?