Kitchen Testers Wanted! Vintage 1920s "Potato-Carrot Scallop" might be the best Scalloped Potatoes recipe! Will you try it?


This is really, really good and can be a meal by itself or a side dish. Most of us think of scalloped potatoes as being cheesy but this 1928 recipe contained no cheese. That's probably because compared to today people ate very little of it during the 1920s. Besides, this dish doesn't need it. We're still going to enjoy buttery, creamy goodness without compounding it with calories. Try this at home (or at least scroll through to see the tempting pics) and you'll see what I mean. I made only minor modifications to the original recipe, mainly the omission of bread crumbs on top. Again, it doesn't need 'em:

2 pounds of peeled and sliced about 1/8 of an inch Russet potatoes: 720 calories

2 very large (weighed in at 9 ounces) peeled and also sliced about 1/8 of an inch carrots. I used heirloom orange and yellow: 105 calories

1/2 cup chopped frozen onion (I prefer the taste and texture of freshly sliced yellow onions in any dish, it's in the original recipe, but the trade-off of onion smell on my hands cancels out any wins for me. For you it might not, so slice, cry and fry away!): 30 calories

1 stick (yes, a whole stick! That's 8 tbsp) of butter: 800 calories

2 1/2 cups whole milk: 375 calories

1/4 cup tapioca flour (you can use white gluten-filled flour like the original): 400 calories

1 tsp salt (you can always salt yours later if this isn't enough)

Sprinkles of pepper and parsley on top.

I used my super-sized #12 antique iron skillet for maximum browning real estate. The right baking dish will ensure the potatoes and carrots will become golden on top but are also covered with the white sauce so that they will turn tender as they cook. 

Place the sliced carrots, potatoes and chopped onions in your baking dish. Because I used a well-seasoned skillet and this dish is laden with butter I didn't have to grease it, but if you use a glass or other dish you will definitely want to grease it beforehand (and be sure to factor in those extra calories for those of you who keep count. Even if you don't, Elmer Wheeler of The Fat Boy's Book reminds us: "Not even Houdini could have figured out a way to slip a candy bar past your stomach's adding machine.")


Next, turn your stove top to medium and in a pan, melt that real stick of butter. It kind of looks like art in my iron skillet, no? There was a time when I would have considered butter Satan (in a bad way) and synthetic substitutes my saving grace. That was the heavier and less healthy me. The healthier and slimmer me knows its' ok to (for most of us, but if your doc said otherwise, trust them) savor the scalloped sauciness because the saturated fat it adds per serving will be one tablespoon. We're not talking about scalloped breakfast, lunch and dinner or eating the whole panful. We good?


Once it's just about fully melted, slowly add the flour and salt, stirring it together as you go.
 

Next, add the milk slowly and keep stirring until it forms a thick white sauce.


Pour the white sauce over the potatoes, carrots and onions being sure to do so evenly. Sprinkle with dried parsley and black pepper.


Cover with foiled and bake in a pre-heated 350 degree oven for 30 minutes, then uncovered for one hour or until browned and tender. The wonderful smell and sizzle will dazzle you!


Makes eight servings with about 300 calories each. It's usually a side dish, but with the potatoes, vegetables, fats and protein from the milk it can be a small nutritious meal.


I'd love for you to try this at home and report back with your results in the comments below! This recipe will be in my book Thrifty Vintage Gluten-Free Recipes so it would be great to know how multiple kitchen testing and tasting pans out. Who will play?

Update: Here is blog reader Tina's delicious results described in her own words in the comments below. Thanks, Tina!

Comments

  1. I'll play! Plans with friends tomorrow, but how about Tuesday?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Of course, Tina! Whenever it works for you! Looking forward to hearing your results. :)

      Delete
  2. I will make it. Sonja

    ReplyDelete
  3. Oh, this looks fantastic!!! I would like to try it this weekend. Love the heirloom carrots!

    ReplyDelete
  4. Averyl, this was amazing! A real winner. The sauce was velvety-smooth and delicious. I was out of whole milk, so used 2%, but it still came out very rich. I also added 1/4 cup of diced, sauteed red peppers I had in the fridge, but otherwise stayed to the recipe as written. Baked mine in a 9x13 Le Creuset roasting pan at 375 for 30 minutes covered in foil, then 350 for 45 minutes with the foil taken off. I let it set for 15 minutes before serving.

    I think some nice variations I'd like to try is parsnips for the carrots, or diced butternut squash and a little sage instead of parsley. Another change I'm going to try is substituting cheese for the butter, blending the flour in the milk instead of making a roux.

    I'm looking forward to your recipe book!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. This makes me very happy to hear! Thanks, Stephanie!

      Delete
    2. I made this with some cheddar and, seriously, it didn't add anything special. The original way is sooo tasty!

      Delete
  5. Just made this tonight! It was so yummy and creamy and definitely didn't need cheese! I will be making this more often. Husband even said it was amazing! Its a win!!

    ReplyDelete
  6. Hi, Avery. As promised, I made it last night, I don't know how to upload a picture into a comment, or I would send you one. It was delicious, and the definition of comfort food with that creamy sauce and the soft potatoes and carrots. I did make a couple of changes in that I made only half (we're two), and I sprinkled on real parsley at the end as I had some sitting around that needed to be used. Plus I prefer the fresh to the dried anyway. Like Stephanie, I also baked mine in an oval Le Creuset dish. It looked so homey and pretty coming out of the oven.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That sounds lovely and I would love to see a photo! If you want, you can send me a message through the contact form on my blog. I will reply to it so you will have my email, and then you can reply back with a pic that I'll upload here.

      Delete
  7. Averyl, I don't like smelly hands either, but rubbing your hands on stainless steel (I have a soap shaped stainless steel thing, but even a stainless steel sink works) removes smells like magic! Even garlic and seafood! It's the strangest thing, but it works!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Marian, I had never heard of this and just looked it up. Fascinating and very good to know! Thank you!

      Delete

Post a Comment

Comments are now closed on Outdated By Design which was retired in April of 2017. I am leaving my blog archives online. If you need to reach me please use the handy contact form. Thanks!