I made whole grain gluten-free bread from scratch! And I broke the rules!


I'm feeling very victorious right now! (I'd much rather my kitchen accomplishments go to my head than my waist!) I thought I'd never be able to make delicious, healthy, whole grain gluten-free bread that looks like and tastes like real bread. This IS real bread! There is NO rice flour, xanthan gum (or any gums!) in this loaf of oat molasses bread. Almost every gluten-free guru or hack will tell you you need xanthan gum. It's in most every commercially available gluten-free bread or mix. This bread breaks the rules and is proof that you can make good bread without it. The recipe for this loaf of bread will be in my book, Thrifty Vintage Gluten-Free Recipes! I hope you're getting excited!!

Comments

  1. I really like a good bread! Sharing bread goes back to the early days of humankind. The best I ever had was in the bush in South Africa made by the locals. We had it warm with butter in the evening and then room temperature and hard the next morning. It was made with several types of whole grains. They said it represented the diverse nature of the SA society. I've thought about writing a column on the best breads I've had in my life so far.

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    1. That sounds really wonderful! I'd love to read a column about the best bread you've had and the stories that accompany them. :)

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  2. I've got some regular (wheat) bread in the oven right now, but that does look like a beautiful loaf of bread. That's quite an accomplishment for a gluten-free loaf. I would bake that even being a wheatie.

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    1. I LOVE to hear that this loaf appeals to a seasoned "wheatie" (cute!) :)

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  3. I'm not on gluten-free, but this looks yummy enough to try!

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    1. It is and I hope you will try the recipe if you buy my book. I have tweaked it a bit further and it's even better now. Thanks for the encouragement!

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  4. I have your book and I want to try some of the recipes. I'm not gluten intolerant but any time we can bypass modern wheat might be a good thing. Have you heard of einkorn wheat? It's essentially an ancient grain not changed or modified in any way. Some people who are gluten sensitive can consume baked goods made from it without a problem. Not sure about a true gluten intolerance, though. I've also heard that there are not as many gluten sensitive people in Europe due to the wheat there hasn't been as modified over the years as ours have.

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    1. I have heard of einkorn. I hope you enjoy the bread from my cookbook, and thanks for your purchase! :)

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